The Crossed Memorial Ring

082416_TOIL_1410 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1409 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1411 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1412 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1410 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1409 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1411 copy.jpg
082416_TOIL_1412 copy.jpg
sold out

The Crossed Memorial Ring

500.00

Metal: 18K Gold

Stone: Diamond

Size: 6.75

Era: 1880

What You Should Know: Ring is fully hallmarked. Faint inscription inside shank reads "Hopkins." 

In 1886, a lovely light read titled “Rules of Etiquette and Home Culture; or What To Do and How To Do It” was published and swept the nation. A whole chapter in this how to book was dedicated on the correct way to mourn the loss of a loved one. Apparently there was a right and a wrong way to do such a thing, and the right way involved a lot of rules about fashion.

The standard mourning period for a widow was two years. The first year, she could only wear black wool dresses and absolutely no jewelry unless it was black. The following six months black silk and white frills were added to the wardrobe, but still only jet jewels were allowed. Eventually, when a widow would reach the last six months of her prescribed mourning period, black, grey, white, and violet clothes of any material were permitted, and luckily jewelry made out of gold was finally not so taboo.

Seeing as this beautiful Victorian diamond memorial ring features a black enamel face, we think someone could have possibly gotten away with wearing this stunner outside of the last 6 months of their mourning period. Set into the black enamel is a white diamond cross, which was often used when commemorating the loss of someone of royal stature. All set on a warm 18k yellow engraved shank. It’s nice to think that such a beautiful piece was used as a small joy during someone’s time of darkness, a beacon of light at the end of the journey.

 

Add To Cart