Renaissance Sapphire Poison Ring

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Renaissance Sapphire Poison Ring

5,000.00

Metal: 18K Gold (tests throughout)

Stone: Sapphire

Size: 7

Era: 1610 - 1630

What You Should Know: Sapphire Cap is removable.

*This ring is resizable, but we do not suggest resizing as it is a museum quality piece. 

There is a famous phrase in Italian, “Versare alla traditora”. The traitor is always pouring. This ominous saying actually has roots in jewelry.

Poison rings originated in India and were adapted in Europe in the 16th century. They were finger rings fashioned with a hidden compartment with either a hinge or detachable detail for its cover. Supposedly, people would keep fatal poison in these tiny chambers... just in case. The poison could easily be slipped into an enemies drink while they turned away; hence, the Italian phrase that is still considered an insult some 500 years later. The poison could also be self-administered in an instant when suicide would be more appealing than guaranteed capture and torture. It’s been debated if a ring could contain the amount of poison it would take to actually become deathly, so their victims are likely few and far between.

Poison rings were not only used for such malice purposes though. Also called pill box or locket rings, they were often used as carriers of perfume, mementos, locks of hair, or the tiniest of keepsakes. Even small portraits of saints have been found in Renaissance era poison rings.

This unbelievable poison ring is a museum quality Renaissance work of art. A cabochon sapphire acts as the distraction from the real purpose of the ring, as that cap is removable to showcase the hidden slot for poison. The sapphire is a beautiful shade of blue, especially next to the rare 16k yellow gold setting and band. We consider the shank to be a piece of small-scale sculpture with interesting movement, shapes, and engraving. We ensure you it is now poison free, but it is a killer of a ring. 

 

 

 

 

 

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