The Early Georgian French Carnival Ring

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20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11942 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11943 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11944 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11941 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11942 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11943 copy.jpg
20170405_French Georgian Masquerade Ring_11944 copy.jpg

The Early Georgian French Carnival Ring

9,500.00

Metal: 18K Gold

Stone: Enamel with diamonds and garnet

Era: 1700

Size: 75.5

What you Should Know: Slight wear to diamonds and garnet. Stones are fully secure. Enamel work has chipped over time. Possibly once a locket ring, now sealed.

*This ring is not resizable.

Oh how we wish that masquerade balls were still a thing. Visualizing the ornate and mysterious parties of centuries ago, with the gilded masks and over the top dresses, there simply is not a modern comparison. Parties that entail disguising your identity date back to the 12th century, but the masquerade ball as we know it was really a production of 16th century Italy.

The whole point of masquerade balls, also known as carnivals, was to have one night where you can act any way you please with little to no repercussions. Wearing a lavish costume with a masked face was basically the only rule. They were nights of parades, pageants, music, dancing, and endless flirting with mysterious who left you guessing who they were all night. Some carnivals required everyone to reveal their true selves at the stroke of midnight. The most infamous mask, and eventually the most popular choice, was the bauta. A white mask that covered the entire face with exaggerated noses or chins.

 This insanely cool ring hails from the early half of the 1700’s, the height of masquerade balls in Europe. It features a domino mask- a full enemal face with a partial covering black mask to conceal your identity, adorned with two diamond eyes and a garnet for lips.

Originating from France, this ring was likely commissioned by a member of the upper class, and given to a special someone that was deeply (and secretly) admired. We like to imagine that she not only wore the ring to the balls themselves, but snuck it into her everyday wardrobe now and then, leaving others wondering if she was the one they had been dancing with that one night of debauchery.

 

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